NSU Screening Programmes

The NSU has five screening programmes and one quality improvement programme.

Antenatal HIV Screening

Antenatal HIV screening, along with the other five antenatal blood tests, is offered to all pregnant women as a routine part of their antenatal care. Most women in New Zealand will be found not to have HIV. Women who are found to have HIV can then be offered treatment to reduce the chance they will transmit the virus to the baby.

Read more about Antenatal HIV Screening here

Antenatal screening for Down syndrome and other conditions – quality improvements

We are working to improve the quality and safety of screening for Down syndrome and other conditions in New Zealand.  It is your choice whether or not to have this screening.

Read more about Antenatal screening for Down syndrome and other conditions – quality improvements here

BreastScreen Aotearoa

New Zealand’s free national breast screening programme checks women for signs of early breast cancer. Regular mammograms are available for women aged between 45 and 69 to reduce their risk of dying of breast cancer.

Read more about BreastScreen Aotearoa here

National Cervical Screening Programme

The National Cervical Screening Programme is available to all women in New Zealand between 20 and 70 years old. The screening test checks for abnormal cell changes to the cervix, reducing the risk of women developing cervical cancer.

Read more about National Cervical Screening Programme here

Newborn Metabolic Screening Programme

The Newborn Metabolic Screening Programme screens for rare but potentially serious disorders such as phenylketonuria (PKU), cystic fibrosis, and congenital hypothyroidism. A blood sample is taken from your baby’s heel at 48 hours of age (the ‘heel prick’ or ‘Guthrie’ test).  If a disorder is found, early treatment can prevent permanent damage or death.

Read more about Newborn Metabolic Screening Programme here

Universal Newborn Hearing Screening Programme

​Newborn hearing screening checks whether your baby hears well.  If your baby has a hearing loss, finding it early is good for their language, learning and social development.  All babies can now have access to newborn hearing screening free of charge.

Read more about Universal Newborn Hearing Screening Programme here

Page last updated: 22 November 2014